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Sunday, January 1st 2017

12:05 AM

Daily Reading




                           


To Mrs. Francis Leggett





ALMORA





20 June '97





DEAR MOTHER —





Herewith I take the liberty to introduce to you Miss Tremayne of London, a particular friend of mine going over to the States.





Any help given to her would greatly oblige.





Yours in the Lord,





VIVEKANANDA





 


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To Sister Nivedita





ALMORA,


 


20th June, 1897.





MY DEAR MISS NOBLE, 





. . . Let me tell you plainly. Every word you write I value, and every letter is welcome a hundred times. Write whenever you have a mind and opportunity, and whatever you like, knowing that nothing will be misinterpreted, nothing unappreciated. I have not had any news of the work for so long. Can you tell me anything? 





I do not expect any help from India, in spite of all the jubilating over me. They are so poor! 


But I have started work in the fashion in which I myself was trained — that is to say, under the trees, and keeping body and soul together anyhow. The plan has also changed a little. I have sent some of my boys to work in the famine districts. It has acted like a miracle. 





I find, as I always thought, that it is through the heart, and that alone, that the world can be reached. The present plan is, therefore, to train up numbers of young men (from the highest classes, not the lowest. 





For the latter I shall have to wait a little), and the first attack will be made by sending a number of them over a district. When these sappers and miners of religion have cleared the way, there will then be time enough to put in theory and philosophy. 





A number of boys are already in training, but the recent earthquake has destroyed the poor shelter we had to work in, which was only rented, anyway. Never mind. The work must be done without shelter and under difficulties. . . . As yet it is shaven heads, rags, and casual meals. This must change, however, and will, for are we not working for it, head and heart? . . . 





It is true in one way that the people here have so little to give up — yet renunciation is in our blood. One of my boys in training has been an executive engineer, in charge of a district. That means a very big position here. He gave it up like straw! . . . 





With all love,





Yours in the Truth,





VIVEKANANDA


 






 





 



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Sunday, January 1st 2017

12:05 AM

Daily Reading




 





To Mrs. Francis Leggett





ALMORA





20 June '97





DEAR MOTHER 





Herewith I take the liberty to introduce to you Miss Tremayne of London, a particular friend of mine going over to the States.





Any help given to her would greatly oblige.





Yours in the Lord,





VIVEKANANDA





======================================


 





To Sister Nivedita





ALMORA,





20th June, 1897.





MY DEAR MISS NOBLE,





. . . Let me tell you plainly. Every word you write I value, and every letter is welcome a hundred times. Write whenever you have a mind and opportunity, and whatever you like, knowing that nothing will be misinterpreted, nothing unappreciated.





I have not had any news of the work for so long. Can you tell me anything? I do not expect any help from India, in spite of all the jubilating over me. They are so poor!





But I have started work in the fashion in which I myself was trained — that is to say, under the trees, and keeping body and soul together anyhow. The plan has also changed a little. I have sent some of my boys to work in the famine districts. It has acted like a miracle. 





I find, as I always thought, that it is through the heart, and that alone, that the world can be reached. The present plan is, therefore, to train up numbers of young men (from the highest classes, not the lowest. For the latter I shall have to wait a little), and the first attack will be made by sending a number of them over a district. When these sappers and miners of religion have cleared the way, there will then be time enough to put in theory and philosophy. 





A number of boys are already in training, but the recent earthquake has destroyed the poor shelter we had to work in, which was only rented, anyway. Never mind. The work must be done without shelter and under difficulties. . . . As yet it is shaven heads, rags, and casual meals. This must change, however, and will, for are we not working for it, head and heart? . . .





It is true in one way that the people here have so little to give up — yet renunciation is in our blood. One of my boys in training has been an executive engineer, in charge of a district. That means a very big position here. He gave it up like straw! . . .





With all love,





Yours in the Truth,





VIVEKANANDA












 



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Sunday, January 1st 2017

12:05 AM

Daily Reading

 




                              




MAYAVATI, HIMALAYAS,




 




15th January, 1901.




 




MY DEAR STURDY,




 




     I learn from Saradananda that you have sent over Rs. 1,529-5-5 to the Math, being the money that was in hand for work in England.  I am sure it will be rightly used.




 




     Capt. Sevier passed away about three months ago.  They have made a fine place here in the mountains and Mrs. Sevier means to keep it up.  I am on a visit to her, and I may possibly come over to England with her.




 




     I wrote you a letter from Paris.  I am afraid you did not get it.




 




     So sorry to learn the passing away of Mrs. Sturdy.  She has been a very good wife and good mother, and it is not ordinarily one meets with such in this life.




 




     This life is full of shocks, but the effects pass away anyhow, that is the hope.




 




     It is not because of your free expression of opinion in your last letter to me that I stopped writing.  I only let the wave pass, as is my wont.  Letters would only have made a wave of a little bubble.




 




     Kindly tender my regards and love to Mrs. Johnson and other friends if you meet them.




 




And I am ever yours in the Truth,




 




VIVEKANANDA,




 




 




==============================================




 




 




[Letter to Mrs. Ole Bull]




 




THE MATH, BELUR,




HOWRAH DIST., BENGAL,




 




26th January, 1901




 




MY DEAR MOTHER,




 




     Many thanks for your very encouraging words.  I needed them very much just now.  The gloom has not lifted with the advent of the new century, it is visibly thickening.  I went to see Mrs. Sevier at Mayavati.  On my way I learnt of the sudden death of the Raja of Khetri.  It appears he was restoring some old architectural monument at Agra, at his own expense, and was up some tower on inspection.  Part of the tower came down, and he was instantly killed.




 




     The three cheques have arrived. They will reach my cousin when next I see her.




 




     Joe is here, but I have not seen her yet.




 




     The moment I touch Bengal, especially the Math, the asthmatic fits return!  The moment I leave, I recover!




 




     I am going to take my mother on pilgrimage next week.  It may take months to make the complete round of pilgrimages.  This is the one great wish of a Hindu widow.  I have brought only misery to my people all my life.  I am trying at least to fulfil this one wish of hers.




 




     I am so glad to learn all that about Margot; everybody here is eager to welcome her back.  I hope Dr. Bose has completely recovered by this time.




 




     I had a beautiful letter also from Mrs. Hammond.  She is a great soul.




 




     However, I am very calm and self-possessed this time and find everything better than I ever expected.




     With all love.




 




Ever your son,




 




VIVEKANANDA.




 




 








 




 


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